Best Survival Bow for Long Term Hunting [Top 5]

Best Survival Bow for Long Term Hunting Top 5

I’ve been on the lookout for the best survival bow after breaking the limb of my recurve bow during my 180 day survival expedition: a compact, simple, and reliable bow that can be used to hunt small and big game in a long term wilderness survival scenario and that I could easily carry in a backpack or INCH bag.

I’ve narrowed it down to the 5 best survival bows in the market. And I compare them in this article according to their portability, weight, power, durability, simplicity, and ergonomics.

All of these bows have a draw weight of 40 to 50 lbs.  Fifty pounds is the minimum required to hunt moose, elk and brown bear in many states, but 40 lbs is enough for other big game like deer, black bear and wolf as long as you have an appropriate broad head point.

I’m not considering crossbows or compound bows because they are not as compact or lightweight and their design is not as reliable as traditional bows.

1 Primal Gear Survival Bow

2 SAS Tactical Survival Bow

3 Spectre Survival Bow II

4 Samick Sage Takedown Recurve Bow

Xpectre Rapture

Portability and Weight: Best Survival Bow

Folded LengthAssembled LengthWeight
Primal Gear

23 in

 

59 in

2.25 lbs
SAS Tactical

21 in

60 in

2.2 lbs
Spectre II

23 in

50″ (35 lbs), 48″ (45 lbs), 46″ (55 lbs)

2.3 lbs
Samick Sage

22 in

62 in

2.5 lbs
Xpectre Rapture 

24 in

 

46 in

2.2 lbs

 

Power, Durability, and Simplicity: Best Survival Bow

 

Draw weightMaterialsEasy to StringAssembly
Primal Gear40, 50, 55 lbsRiser: Aircraft grade Aluminum (T6 – 6061)

Limbs: Fiberglass

Yes

No tools needed; very durable, reliable and simple system.

SAS Tactical40, 50, 55 lbsRiser: Aircraft grade Aluminium (T6 with anodized coating)

Limbs: Composite

Yes

No tools required but the limb securing bolts are easy to lose

Spectre II45, 55 lbsRiser: Aluminum

Limbs: Resin and fiberglass

Yes

No tools required, the limbs are very simple to attach to the riser. It’s a reliable system.

Samick Sage40, 45, 50, 55 lbsRiser: Laminated Olive Dymondwood and Hard Maple

Limbs: Hard Maple laminated with fiberglass

You need a stringer

No tools required, the limbs are very easy to screw to the riser. The bolts are not that easy to lose, but it could happen.

Xpectre Rapture40/50lbs Limbs are reversed to change the weightRiser: Aluminum

Limbs: Resin and fiberglass

Yes

No tools required, the limbs are very simple to attach to the riser. It’s a very similar system to the Spectre II.

Ergonomics and Arrow Rest

GripAmbidextrousArrow Rest
Primal Gear


Second best grip after the Samick Sage. I would add padding to improve the grip.

Ambidextrous,

change the

limbs with a screwdriver.

The arrow rest is off the shelf. It is a very reliable rest. It is recommended to shoot feathered arrows

SAS Tactical


Not very ergonomic

Ambidextrous,

change the

arrow rest.

The arrow rest could break easily

Spectre II


Not ergonomic, not even slightly.

Not

Ambidextrous,

there are left

or right hand

models

available

The arrow rest is very flimsy and it is definitely its Achilles tendon

Samick Sage

The most comfortable grip.

Not

Ambidextrous,

there are left

or right hand

models

available

The arrow rest is off the shelf. It is a very reliable rest. It is recommended to shoot feathered arrows

Xpectre Rapture

Terrible grip

Ambidextrous,

no tools needed

This arrow rest is flimsy as the Spectre II but at least it’s protected by being inside the riser.

Best Survival Bow for Long Term Hunting [Top 5]

Overall I believe the Primal Gear Survival Bow is the best survival bow out there because it is simple, reliable, and has good ergonomics. The SAS Tactical Survival Bow is another excellent option but the exposed arrow rest makes it slightly less durable. The Samick Sage is a great bow, although it’s heavier and its limbs are not as sturdy. The Primal Gear Bow is such a good design that there are a few imitations.

 


2 Comments on "Best Survival Bow for Long Term Hunting [Top 5]"

  1. John Thornton | October 25, 2017 at 12:51 | Reply

    I own both the SAS and PGU. The problem I have with the PGU is that its too long for most of my packs and you cant store arrows inside of it. With the SAS you can do both so portability is a major plus when compared to the PGU. I think your review is a little off with regards ergonomics and materials. The handle is actually rather comfortable once you shoot it. Give it a try I am sure you would like it as much as I do. I choose the SAS over my other bows any day. Thanks for a good review otherwise.

  2. John Thornton | October 25, 2017 at 12:57 | Reply

    Oh one more thing and not to be funny but anyone who knows archery knows the Bear Weather rest on the SAS is one of the most used and most bombproof arrow rests tht have EVER been made. EVER. My SAS bow has well over 5000 shots on it and has been packed in and out of my bag so many times and it still has the original rest on it. Its very durable and I would not be concerned about it. The nice thing is you can shoot vanes and feather fletched arrows. With the PGU shelf you can only shoot feather or I find it kicks up when the fletching hits the 90degree shelf area. The only plus I see on the PGU is a quicker setup but then you may as well purchase the new SAS Recon bow. Did you see that one? It pretty awesome and I plan to buy one as soon as I have some cash.

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